What Statistics Can and Can’t Tell Us About Ourselves  | The New Yorker

Very good article about statistics and their limitations.  Should be required reading for medical students and health journalists.  Contains my new favorite example (attributed to mathematician Ian Stewart) of the ecological fallacy: The average person has one breast and one testicle. In the era of Big Data, we’ve come to believe that, with enough information, …

Continue reading What Statistics Can and Can’t Tell Us About Ourselves  | The New Yorker

Links of Interest: Does the news reflect what we die from? – Our World in Data

Great post about actual vs. perceived risk and amplification by the media. There is a large disconnect between what gets covered in the media and the day-to-day reality for most. How do causes of death in the US match with media coverage and what people search for online? Source: Does the news reflect what we …

Continue reading Links of Interest: Does the news reflect what we die from? – Our World in Data

Protocol – Behavioral Economics and Clinical Preventive Services Scoping Review

Just advertising that we're starting a Scoping Review. Scoping reviews aren't eligible for registration on Prospero, so we're using Open Science Framework's registration option and blogging/tweeting about it. Our topic? The use of behavioral economics (concepts and interventions) in improving the appropriate use of discrete clinical preventive services. Behavioral economics and associated interventions and explanations …

Continue reading Protocol – Behavioral Economics and Clinical Preventive Services Scoping Review